Group therapy if a form of counseling where treatment happens with multiple people, typically one therapist and 6-12 participants. Groups typically have a single focus, for example:

  • a problem the participants have in common (e.g. depression, grief, etc.),
  • a skill the participants all desire to learn (e.g. meditation, mindfulness, etc.), or
  • a modality that is used in common to address the participants’ varied problems (e.g. a yoga group).

Circle of hands group therapy

Group members improve in two ways. First, from the interventions of the therapist.  Second, from observing and receiving feedback from other members of the group. Like individual counseling, group therapy is confidential. The group facilitator covers clear expectations and guidelines either before or at the group’s first meeting.

Recommendations for group therapy over individual (or in addition to individual counseling) occur for a number of reasons:

  • Increased feedback
  • Modeling
  • Skill development
  • Laboratory to try out new skills

While the idea of group therapy can intimidate those who have not tried it, fears usually ease quite quickly.  Most people become comfortable and familiar with the process over the course of a few weeks.  No one ever is forced to say anything or do anything in the group.  However, those who gain the most help and satisfaction actively participate. They share their feelings in the group, offer feedback, and receive feedback from others.  Many clients have said that group therapy changed their lives.

For questions about group therapy, contact Life Care: 630-423-5935